How to Create a Universally Flattering Smokey Eye with Charlotte Tilbury

As we’re entering into the season of nighttime looks, I need to share the perfect smokey eye how-to. As you may be able to tell, I don’t work on video content, but I’m sharing a tutorial from the goddess who practically patented the “feline flick,” Charlotte Tilbury. As much as I don’t enjoy sharing content I haven’t created, Refinery29 had this exclusive how-to with British makeup artist, Charlotte Tilbury. This one isn’t even on Miss Tilbury’s YouTube channel! I apologize in advance: you will be subjected to watch a sponsored ad at first and you will see R29’s logo, then the tutorial will begin. Enjoy! 🖤

How-To: Getting the Kate Moss Signature Sex Kitten Look

It’s no secret that I have a minor obsession with Kate Moss…many women in the fashion industry do, regardless of industry. After her collaboration with TOPSHOP launched earlier this year, Nordstrom caught up with her makeup artist, Charlotte Tilbury, and posted a how-to on their Beauty Blog. Follow along below after watching the posted how-to video to see how you can achieve Kate the Great’s iconic look for tonight’s festivities:

1. Prep. Get your skin ready with a cream. Apply foundation and conceal targeted areas, including under-eye circles, blemishes or red spots. Utilize finishing powder down the T-zone to cover any pores.

2. Feline Eye. Use an eyelash curler (your secret weapon) to curl your lashes. Next, with your finger, pull the outer corner of your eye out slightly into a point to create the feline shape. Look straight ahead into a mirror and, using a black liquid eyeliner pen, draw a line until you get 3/4 of the way across your upper lash line. Mark a point on the outer corner of the eye where you want to end your line. Continue along the lash line and angle up to the outer point you marked to create a V shape along the eye. Repeat on the other eye—being sure to make another mark that’s even with the first eye. After your feline flick is complete, line your waterline with a black pencil. For a more dramatic look, add more of the black liner over the liquid liner.

3. Blend. Take a neutral grey and blend this color across the entire lid. Use a blending brush to add a darker shade of grey into the crease in a windshield wiper motion across the full eye socket. A darker shade of grey will create a smoky look under the eyelash line and along the feline flick lash line. Of course, apply mascara. Layer on more mascara for a more dramatic look.

4. Bronze. Use a powder brush and a swirling motion to apply bronzer to the temples, the forehead and the cheeks. Use the same shade in order to sculpt and carve out the cheeks by applying it right below the cheekbones.

5. Lips to Finish. Always start the lips with a neutral lip liner. If you are not sure where to put your lip liner, smile and then apply to your lip line. Add a nude lipstick on top. If you want a more matte look, add some powder over the lips.

Photo via

How-to: Fixing Broken/Cracked Eyeshadow

It’s a typical Monday morning: you’re running late because you couldn’t drag yourself out of bed on time. After you haphazardly throw an outfit together, you’re frantically trying to “put your face on” in the bathroom. One subtle elbow movement and you’re watching your favorite pressed powder falling towards the tile floor in slow-mo. Metallic pigment splayed every which-way on your floor, you sweep it up, pissed that you’ll have to repurchase that shade later in the week. Don’t fret: broken shadows ARE fixable. Granted, they won’t look as perfectly pressed and pretty as it did newly out of the box, but you won’t have to shell out that $16.50+ for its replacement.

Supplies needed:

    • Broken shadow
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Toothpick/Q-tip with cotton tips removed (will be used as a tool to break up the powder even more)
    • Quarter (optional)
    • Paper towels
    • OPTIONAL: Eye-dropper, otherwise: CAREFULLY pour the rubbing alcohol
    • **NOTE: these instructions are under the assumption that your broken eyeshadow is a single compact, not part of a value-set with multiple individual shades. Though these are fixable as well—see photos for reference.

Bronze cracked shadowGold cracked shadow2

  1. Sanitize the tool you’re using to break up the shadow even more. You don’t want to be using a dirty tool as this could cause eye infections…and you will actually have to buy the shadow’s replacement after that.
  2. Using the tool, break up the shadow even more into a finer powder, focusing on the clumps, and making sure to not make a mess on your counter. Keep all powder contained within the shadow’s original casing.
  3. Taking a bit of rubbing alcohol, pour a bit into the cap (or have some ready in the eye dropper), pour a few drops into the eyeshadow (this amount depends on how much powder was in the compact). Put in a little at first—you can always add more. NOTE: if you do add too much, it’s no biggy, you’ll just have to wait a bit longer for the excess alcohol to evaporate.
    Gold adding alcoholGold mixing in alcoholGold goopy
  4. Using your tool, move the shadow/alcohol mixture around until it’s fairly mixed and the texture is goopy like a thick paste. Once you’ve achieved this consistency, put your tool aside.
  5. Taking the eyeshadow case, “drop” it unto a hard surface a few times to smooth out the goops and make sure the mixture is settled. This will ensure that the finished product has a smoother surface rather than bumpy/clumpy. Do NOT do this step if you are fixing a broken shadow in a palette—ONLY do this step if fixing a single stand-alone shadow.
  6. Set the shadow aside and allow for the rubbing alcohol to evaporate. This can take as little as 2hrs — I left mine overnight for convenience sake. Again, if you added a bit too much alcohol in step 3 you will just have to wait a wee bit longer, and overnight could be your best bet.
  7. To ensure that your shadow is dry to the touch, gently touch the surface with your fingertip—if the shadow gives in to the middle, and your finger has quite a bit of product transfer, it still needs time to dry. If it’s solid, not too too much product is transferred to your fingertip, and doesn’t collapse into itself you are now able to press the powder down even more.
  8. Take a tissue, folded twice, and lay it across the top of the now-dry shadow fully covering the pigment. Gently but firmly press your fingertips into the tissue to compact the powder down even more. If you would like the surface to be evenly compacted, you may also use a quarter. Place the coin ON TOP of the tissue making sure that it is centered, and press gently but firmly. If you press too firmly you can still damage the eyeshadow as it is not fully dry.
  9. Set this now compacted shadow aside to fully dry overnight, and you’ll be ready to use it the next morning. Voila!

Both dried shadows
If you’re more of learn-by-seeing type of person, here is the YouTube video I referenced.

How to Pronounce Designer Names 101

Just in time for the start of #NYFW, the staff at Harper’s Bazaar was kind enough to compile an introductory list of designer names that the average person may have a tough time pronouncing…whose show am I watching again??

Anna Sui: anna swee

Ann Demeulemeester: ann de-mule-eh-meester

Azzedine Alaia: azz-eh-deen ah-lie-ah

Badgley Mischka: badge-lee meesh-kah

Balenciaga: bah-len-see-ah-gah

Balmain: bahl-mahhhhn

Bottega Veneta: bow-tay-guh vah-netta

Christian Lacroix: christian luh-kwa

Christian Louboutin: christian loo-boo-tan

Comme des Garçons: comb dey gah-sown

Dolce & Gabbana: dol-chey and gab-ana

Dries Van Noten: drees van know-ten

Gareth Pugh: gareth pew

Giambattista Valli: gee-am-bah-tease-ta vah-lee

Gianfranco Ferre: gee-ahn-franco feh-ray

Givenchy: zjee-von-shee

Hermès: er-mez

Hervé Léger: air-vay lay-jah

Hussein Chalayan: hoo-sane sha-lion

Issey Miyake: iss-ee mee-yah-key

Jean Paul Gaultier: zhon paul go-tee-ay

Junya Watanabe: jun-yah wat-an-ah-bey

Kinder Aggugini: kinder ag-ooh-gee-nee

Lanvin: lahn-vahn

Loewe: loh-wev-eh

Louis Vuitton: loo-wee vwee-tahn

L’Wren Scott: la-ren scott

Maison Martin Margiela: may-sohn martin mar-jhell-ah

Marchesa: mar-kay-sah

Mary Katrantzou: mary cat-trant-zoo

Miu Miu: mew-mew

Monique Lhuillier: monique le-hu-lee-ay

Moschino: mos-key-no

Olivier Theyskens: oh-liv-ee-ay tay-skins

Proenza Schouler: pro-en-zuh skool-er

Rochas: row-shahs

Rodarte: row-dar-tay

Roksanda Ilincic: roksanda ill-in-chik

Salvatore Ferragamo: sal-vah-tor-re fer-ra-gah-moh

Sonia Rykiel: sewn-yah ree-key-el

Thakoon: tah-koon

Versace: vur-sah-chee

Yves Saint Laurent: eve san lau-ron

Yohji Yamamoto: yoh-jee yam-ah-mo-to

 

Photo via

Describing Your Personal Style

It can be difficult to cast a blanket statement on yourself, but honing in on what you think your personal style is can be a great crutch. Thinking of adjectives to describe your look or even the look you want to achieve can be helpful. I started trying to verbalize my style once I realized how complicated shopping could become. Once you define your style it allows you to recognize which brands you align with best, which designers pique your interest, and which color palettes appeal to you. For instance,

I tend to describe my own style as a mix of minimalism, avant garde, dark colors, leather, textures, cozy knits, long hemlines, structure, sleek, rockstar, bohemia, & androgynous at times.

Once I wrote those out, the words helped me realize what I look for most in clothing: textures, tailoring, and the fine details. It also helped me realize which designers piqued my interest and why:


If you aren’t the type for words, it may be better to create a mood board to see which styles attract your eye the most. Flip through the latest issues of Bazaar, Elle, Vogue, Glamour, and W to see which editorial  spreads appeal to you most and tear them out for inspiration from time to time. Or, make a board on your Pinterest. Below are some of my pins from my style board “My Steez” that help me collect my thoughts:


Or if you just straight up don’t know where to begin, take a quiz! I took one on Harper’s Bazaar’s website and it was pretty dead-on:

You are an Avant-Garde.

As an avant-garde, your style oozes a sense of self-assured confidence. You prefer a bit of grit with your glamour, often adding tougher elements of leather and metal hardware to anchor the softer pieces of your outfits. Your wardrobe is a spectrum of neutrals from cream to ebony, enriched by touches of dark brooding hues and deep jewel tones. Despite your rebel without a cause approach, you still possess a clear sense of balanced refinement in your fashion choices. Drawing inspiration from rocker chic legends like Grace Jones, your personal style is an artful curation of bold edginess and understated elegance.


 

I’d love to hear how you define you! Comments are always more than welcome 🙂